64. Outsourced To The Death

I would never take anything a reality TV personality said at face value, nor would I take anything a politician said at face value, so my overall expectations of our new President are and will remain low (and it would be the same had the election turned out differently). Most of the talk about Presidential elections is focused on the short-term, as that is the most immediate and easiest to understand. However, this election may not have been that way. Along with the short-term immediate reasons to vote for (or against) one person or the other, we need to factor in some the long-term results from the past. When former President Bill Clinton signed NAFTA in December 1993 (it went into effect on January 1st 1994) many people were behind him and voted for him because of this. This was a new direction, a new way of thinking and talking about our "ability" to support ourselves economically. This was to a large extent the giving away of our tools of production. If you remember where we were as an economic power when 1994 began and look and see and try to understand how our economy has consistently weakened year by year and try to deeply understand how enfeebled we have become as an economic power in the last 23 years, if you remember where we were as an economic power when 1994 began and look and see and try to understand how many of our well paying manufacturing jobs have been outsourced, how many of our factories have closed, how many of our cities and states are financially struggling or broke due to the low and lost tax revenues from all of those good paying outsourced jobs--then this election may not be as surprising as it may appear on the surface. For me this was a vote against the outsourcing of more American jobs. For me this was middle-class America saying "enough is enough" to politicians on both sides of the aisle. For me this was a rejection of NAFTA and other shortsighted and economically harmful trade agreements our politicians feed upon.

originally posted December 2016
reposted March 2018

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